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Sticky Topic Preserving the Harvest (Read 185 times)
Penthesilea
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Preserving the Harvest
Jan 17th, 2016 at 9:21pm
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One of the problems with Skywise's low salt diet is finding commonly used products that are both low salt and low potassium. It is a Smiley let me tell you. And when I do find something, it's always a bit more expensive in addition to being hard to find. So last night I was going through the Ball Canning book that I bought last summer to see if there was anything in there that I could use.
Quite a bit as it turns out. According to the book -- which is considered the home canning bible and has been for as long as I can remember -- for the majority of recipes the use of salt is optional meaning that you can use as much or as little salt as you want and leaving salt out entirely won't affect the flavor or the preservation of the food. I didn't quite jump up and down but I felt like it. As I have mentioned elsewhere, my mother canned incessantly during my childhood and while I didn't do the actual "putting up" I helped with preparing the food for processing. So. Today I went into Rural King to start pricing canners. They had two sizes: 16 qts. for $89 and 23 qts. for $99. I didn't get one today -- I wanna do some price checking -- but I will be as soon as everyone starts restocking them in a few months. I'll be using this thread to talk about it.
  

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Penthesilea
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Re: Preserving the Harvest
Reply #1 - Jan 22nd, 2016 at 7:43pm
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I'm sitting here thinking about the blizzard hitting the East Coast and remembering the Blizzard of '78 which hit here back in the day and how "global cooling", "emergency preparedness" and "self-sufficiency" are all tied together. Being self-sufficient -- or mostly self-sufficient --  in food makes some aspects of emergency preparedness easier. A stash of home preserved food represents one less thing that would need to be grabbed at the last minute and if you keep your supplies of milk, bread, eggs, coffee/tea and the other "must haves" that you need to feel civilized topped up, you might not even have to do that.

I'll undertake my first project the next time ground chuck goes on sale. I'll buy several pounds, season it and cook it with tomato sauce for chili, divide it up and freeze it. Then the next time chili is on the menu, I'll pull out a bag of "chili base", thaw it, heat it to boiling and start throwing the rest of the ingredients in. If that meets with the family's approval in terms of flavor, the next step will be to can it once I get a canner. That way, I'll be able to stockpile ground meat when it is on sale and not have to worry about it spoiling if the power goes out.


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« Last Edit: Jan 22nd, 2016 at 7:49pm by Penthesilea »  

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